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2022 Federal Election Guide

Information as of 17 May 2022

This guide is intended to highlight the key policarty’s respective platform in its entirety.es and pledges from each of the three major parties for the 2022 Federal Election on Saturday, May 21. The guide may be used to assist voters in making an informed decision on election day, but it is NOT a comprehensive list of each major party’s election pledges. Voters are encouraged to view each party's respective platform in its entirety.

We recognise several smaller parties are also running in this election, alongside a contingent of prominent independents. Some of the smaller parties and independents have only limited policy platforms, making it difficult to compare them to each other and to the major parties. They have not been included in this guide for that reason.

This guide does NOT constitute an endorsement of any of the major parties, nor does it constitute an opposition to the parties not mentioned.

Cost of Living

Coalition
Will press ahead with the third stage of its $158 billion worth of tax cuts announced in 2019.

Will provide a one-off $420 cost of living tax offset from July 1 to low- and middle-income earners.
Labor
Will support the third stage of the Coalition’s tax cuts.

Will also provide a one-off $420 tax offset to low- and middle-income earners.

Has pledged not to introduce any new taxes except to close loop holes for multinationals to create $2 billion revenue over four years.
The Greens
Voted against the Coalition’s tax cuts.

Wants to establish a minimum living wage of 60% of the median wage.

Economy & Finance

Coalition
Has pledged to deliver a $120 billion 10-year infrastructure pipeline.

Will invest $7.1 billion for key regions to transform them into next generation export hubs.
Labor
Has pledged to offer more government contracts to Australian businesses.

Will spend an initial $500 million create a fast rail connection between Sydney, the Central Coast and Newcastle.
The Greens
Has pledged to help fund and rebuild the local manufacturing industry.

Wants to make Australia a science, innovation and green energy superpower.

Jobs

Coalition
Will provide an additional $3.7 billion to support 800,000 new training positions.

Invest $382 million to build female participation in the labour force.
Labor
Aims to grow the local tech industry with 340,000 additional new jobs and support the creation of startups through a government program.

Will invest $15 billion in job-creating projects, particularly focused on the local manufacturing sector.
The Greens
Will increase protections and entitlements for casual and contract workers.

Will boost paid parental leave.

Climate Change

Coalition
Has committed to net zero emissions by 2050.

Its plan relies on carbon capture and storage, as well as low-emission steel production and hydrogen to lower fuel emissions.
Labor
Has committed to net zero emissions by 2050 and a 43 per cent reduction in emissions by 2030.

Will make electric cars more affordable by exempting EVs from tariffs and fringe benefits tax.
The Greens
Want to achieve net zero emissions by 2035 by phasing out coal and gas completely and switching to 100 per cent renewable energy usage.

Housing

Coalition
Will expand its first home buyers and Family Home Guarantees schemes.

Will allow first home buyers to use up to $50,000 from their superannuation to help pay for a house deposit.
Labor
Will implement a program, to reduce the cost of homes by up to 40% by taking an equity stake in a property with the homebuyer.

Will match most of the Coalition’s other housing policies.

Will create 30,000 new social and affordable homes.
The Greens
Has pledged to build one million affordable and community houses over the next 20 years.

Health

Coalition
Will lower the threshold for the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme Safety Net from July 1.

Will lower the cost of OBS medicines by $10, to $32.50.

Will subsidise access to continuous glucose monitoring devices for people with type 1 diabetes, spending $273 million on the program.
Labor
Promised to fund 50 “urgent care clinics” to take the pressure off hospital emergency departments, costing $135 million over four years.

Will cap PBS medication scripts at $30, slightly lower than the Coalition’s pledge.

Will match the Coalition’s continuous glucose monitoring device spend.
The Greens
Want dental care to be included in Medicare.

Want free and universal access to GPs, an end to private health subsidies and free access to menstrual products.

Border Security

Coalition
Will invest $500 million to help build 21 patrol boats for its Pacific neighbours.
Labor
Has pledged to increase its spending in the Pacific by $525 million to boost Australia’s presence in the region amid China’s growing influence.
The Greens
Will close all foreign military bases set up in Australia.

Want to increase Australia’s aid budget to 0.7 per cent of gross national income.

NDIS

Coalition
Says the NDIS will “always be fully funded” but has warned the scheme faces sustainability issues. A report last year said the scheme would cost $60 billion annually by the end of the decade.
Labor
Has promised to review and reform the scheme.

Wants to lift the staffing cap at the NDIS from 3,300 but hasn’t specified by how much.
The Greens
Wants to fully fund the NDIS.

Wants to lift to the NDIS staffing cap to 10,000.

Education

Coalition
Will increase funding per student at schools by 65 per cent over a decade.

Its budget provided almost $20 billion in funding for universities in 2022.

Will create 800,000 new TAFE places across five years.
Labor
Plans to scrap fees for TAFE and create 20,000 more places at universities.

Plans to create a $50 million TAFE Technology Fund to improve IT facilities, workshops and laboratories across the country.
The Greens
Plan to invest $49 billion to fully fund public schools and make school free for all students.

Has pledged to abolish all student debt and make both TAFE and university free.

Childcare

Coalition
Has brought forward childcare subsidy changes, allowing families to receive an additional 30 per cent on the current subsidy.

The policy will cost $1.7 billion over four years.
Labor
Plans to provide a universal 90 per cent subsidy to all families in the long-term.

Will raise the family income threshold for subsidies to $530,000 (from $354,305).
The Greens
Want to make childcare free for most people by scrapping income and activity tests needed to get subsidies.

Aged Care

Coalition
Announced a $17.7 billion package to fund the aged care sector over five years as part of the federal budget in 2021.

Would require staff to spend least three hours and 20 minutes per day with each aged care resident.

From July 2023, one nurse would have to be on shift across a minimum 16 hours a day.
Labor
Pledged to require a registered nurse be on site at all times of the day at aged care facilities.

Would require staff to spend at least three hours and 35 minutes with each resident. It hasn’t specified a requirement for registered nurses to be on shift.

Their total aged care pledge will cost $2.5 billion.
The Greens
Pushing to improve the workforce conditions for aged care workers.

Will make sure aged care services are run not-for-profit.

Retirement

Coalition
Has pledged to freeze the aged pension deeming rate until 2024 .

Will raise the income threshold to expand eligibility for the Commonwealth Seniors Health Card.

Will introduce a scheme to encourage retirees to downsize by allowing $300,000 to be placed into superannuation without penalty.
Labor
Has pledged to match the Coalition’s deeming rate and seniors card eligibility policies.

Has ruled out increases to superannuation taxes or policy changes for self-funded retirees.
The Greens
Want to lower the pension age from 67 to 65 and increase weekly payments by up to $122 a week.

Religious Freedom

Coalition
Has pledged to revive its shelved Religious Discrimination Bill if re-elected.
Labor
Has committed to preventing discrimination against people of faith, including thorough anti-vilification protections.

It said the Coalition’s legislation was “flawed”.
The Greens
Believes that people of faith should be free to practice their religion without fear of harm or prejudice.

Defence

Coalition
Has committed to boost defence spending to 2 per cent of GDP.

Hopes to boost the number of uniformed personnel by 18,500 by 2040 through a $38 billion investment in response to growing tensions with China.

Will invest $108.5 million to boost trades in the local defence industry.
Labor
Won’t let defence spending fall below the government’s target of 2 per cent of GDP.

Will invest $270 billion in new defence capabilities over the next decade.
The Greens
The Greens want to reduce defence spending to 1.5 per cent of GDP.

Immigration

Coalition
Will offer an extra 16,500 humanitarian visas to people fleeing Afghanistan over the next four years.

Will continue its policy to turn back asylum seekers arriving by boat.
Labor
Supports boat turn-backs and offshore process centres.

It hasn’t commented on whether it will increase the number of humanitarian visas offered.
The Greens
Voted against the Coalition’s tax cuts.

Wants to establish a minimum living wage of 60% of the median wage.

 

NB: The information contained in this guide has only been sourced from the respective party websites or the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.